Austin Ten Drivers Club

Welcome to the Austin Ten Drivers Club Forums!

You are not logged in.

#1 2014-11-24 22:20:19

Mat
Guest

Austin 10/4 performance

Hi there does any one know of a way of improving the performance of an Austin 10/4 engine ? it runs perfectly but wondering if there are any tricks or modes to improve the driving performance/experience?

#2 2014-11-28 13:38:19

706_Anthony_and_Brenda_Johnson
Moderator
Registered: 2013-01-04
Posts: 48

Re: Austin 10/4 performance

Matt
It depends on the type of engine you have, for an early, ie 1932 Ten,it was 20 hp, rising steadily up to 32hp by 1939 to compensate for the extra weight! So the engine was extensively developed through its life and only some of the bits are interchangeable, but the SU carb conversion I did on on my 1934 Ten provided more torque and better starting.You may find improvements by using a downdraft manifold and carb as used on the later cars but always bear in mind that the oil system as standard is inadequate for long distance, high speed (ie greater than 45mph) operation, mods are possible to improve this situation and its a great car for touring, home or abroad. Join the ATDC and enjoy the car in fellowship with other enthusiasts of the model.
Tony J

Offline

#3 2014-12-13 00:38:00

594_Phil_Taylor
Members
Registered: 2013-01-04
Posts: 158

Re: Austin 10/4 performance

Matt,
I have improved the performance when I recon a 10 engine by:-
1. Enlarging/polishing the ports to about 1" for exhaust and as big as poss for inlets leaving only 1/16" valve seat, (my current engine has done 39,000 in the last 5yrs with no problem to seats or valves - same with my previous engine). Match the manifold accurately to the ports and gasket, enlarging as necessary. I have fitted later larger inlet valves on early engines which makes them close to the exhaust ones but, again, gave no trouble on long mileages. Earlier heads need slightly enlarging if larger valves are fitted (or if the 38 block is used with the larger inlet valves.)
2. Fitting the postwar manifold from a GS1 engine or a 38/9 Cambridge one with downdraft Zenith, sometimes with larger Main Jet and next size Compensator. Getting the mixture right is critical unless you want to waste petrol! Averages 33 mpg over the year - varying from 37 on open roads in France to 31 in London where I live. Normally at 40/45mph and don't slow down!
3. Lightening the flywheel by over half (which I pay to get done) - obviously does not increase performance but makes the engine more responsive, I drill holes in the clutch housing on the flywheel as well - looks good!
4. I do not skim the head - flexibility is the hallmark of sidevalves - but I tend to use later cylinder blocks because they are cheaper to recondition and bigger inlet valves. If the block has the elongated water passages, I elongate the ones in the head and use the later gaskets. I have used postwar GS1 heads in the past.
5 I use the 12/4 tail pipe on the exhaust as the 10 one is very small and restrictive in my view.
6. I use unleaded with no hardened valve seats - not necessary on cooking engines like prewar Austins - but I do use upper cylinder lubricant to keep carbon deposits to a minimum.
7 Ignition timing - the engines will run at practically any setting but getting it right is important for 'performance'. I reduce the fan blade diameter by a third - I was once told it can take 1BHP to drive the fan!
In the past, I put baffles in the sump to make the hot oil travel further to the pump but it made no difference to the pressure so I do not do it now. I've lightened the crank in the past, polished the rods etc. Everyone has different ideas. No-one is right.  I've pigged around improving these engines for over 40years and the critical idea is to keep them reliable if it is an everyday car like ours, and make it get up to 40 fairly quickly so you are not a pain to modern traffic. I only use Austin bits and only have a Black and Decker drill and perseverance. Others use oil filters, electric fans, alternators, SU carbs, electronic ignition etc and swear it improves performance. Weight reduction is another area which I have tried. Each 50kilos affects performance considerably. Only carry small passengers!!!
As Tony says, later 10s weigh so much more. Use a late 33/34 chromerad.
Hope this helps,
Best wishes
Phil

Offline

#4 2017-01-24 21:22:32

8943_Dave_Harper
Members
Registered: 2016-11-08
Posts: 6

Re: Austin 10/4 performance

Hi has anyone tried to mount an external oil filter kit to help with filtration on the ten/4 and possibly run on modern oil.

Offline

#5 2017-01-24 22:30:04

691_Richard_Ridlington
Members
From: Prestwick/Ayr, Scotland
Registered: 2013-01-04
Posts: 357

Re: Austin 10/4 performance

Hi Dave,

There is a discussion on this subject in the Technical section of the Forum.

If you do a search "Oil Filter" and tick the Technical section you'll find the post next to the bottom on page 1.

There are references to articles in the Club magazine which you may not have - if you would like a copy emailed to you let me know.

Regards,

Richard.

Last edited by 691_Richard_Ridlington (2017-01-25 17:36:16)

Offline

#6 2017-02-01 22:09:40

8943_Dave_Harper
Members
Registered: 2016-11-08
Posts: 6

Re: Austin 10/4 performance

Hi Richard thanks, could you email me a copy of the article. thanks Dave

Offline

#7 2017-02-01 23:08:45

691_Richard_Ridlington
Members
From: Prestwick/Ayr, Scotland
Registered: 2013-01-04
Posts: 357

Re: Austin 10/4 performance

Hi Dave,

I have the scanned copies ready so if you can send me your email address I'll forward them to you.

My email: rmridlington@aol.com

Richard.

Offline

#8 2017-02-03 18:11:44

8943_Dave_Harper
Members
Registered: 2016-11-08
Posts: 6

Re: Austin 10/4 performance

Hi Richard send them to locker.60@ntlworld.com thanks for your time. Dave

Offline

#9 2017-02-06 19:50:07

9186_John_Aukett
Members
Registered: 2017-02-06
Posts: 2

Re: Austin 10/4 performance

Hi I have an austin 12/4 light 1935 & I am looking at fitting an electric petrol pump. Can anyone recommend the best one to fit ?

Offline

#10 2017-02-07 13:27:39

2574_Stephen_Voller
Members
From: Polegate, East Sussex
Registered: 2013-01-04
Posts: 292

Re: Austin 10/4 performance

I'd fit an SU pump intended for Morris Minor and others.
In fact, I keep one to hand with hose connections for my '35 12/4 just for emergencies.
Steve V.

Offline

#11 2017-02-07 17:14:17

813_Peter_Winney
Administrator
Registered: 2013-01-04
Posts: 968

Re: Austin 10/4 performance

2574_Stephen_Voller wrote:

I'd fit an SU pump


Don't forget to pack a rubber mallet to hit it when it fails.

Offline

#12 2017-02-07 19:00:22

2574_Stephen_Voller
Members
From: Polegate, East Sussex
Registered: 2013-01-04
Posts: 292

Re: Austin 10/4 performance

813_Peter_Winney wrote:
2574_Stephen_Voller wrote:

I'd fit an SU pump


Don't forget to pack a rubber mallet to hit it when it fails.

Ha Ha! wink
I usually overhaul and adjust any SU pump I've ever had - easy job.
If the contacts under the cover are ok and the rod / diaphragm throw is correctly adjusted no rubber mallet required.

I have to say though that if your fuel system is all up to scratch from the inside of the tank onwards, then really there is no necessity for an electric pump.

Steve V.

Offline

#13 2017-02-08 13:46:26

6515_Peter_Christie
Members
From: Newton Mearns, Glasgow
Registered: 2013-01-04
Posts: 345

Re: Austin 10/4 performance

Hi John,

Fitting an electric fuel pump also presents a possible danger - modern vehicles have a cut-out device to stop the fuel flow when the engine stops, but if your pump is simply wired through the ignition switch it can potentially cause a fuel spill and a fire risk.

Regards,

Peter C. [6515]

Offline

#14 2017-02-08 14:16:20

2574_Stephen_Voller
Members
From: Polegate, East Sussex
Registered: 2013-01-04
Posts: 292

Re: Austin 10/4 performance

I would just add that if you are fitting an electric pump you must be sure that it's NOT a high pressure pump - hence my vote for the SU Morris Minor pump or equivalent.
So long as the carburrettor float / fuel level valve is operating correctly there should be no major risk -over a million Morris Minors can't be wrong!

But just to repeat my previous reply :- If your fuel system is all up to scratch from the inside of the tank onwards, then really there is no necessity for an electric pump.

Regards Steve V.

Offline

#15 2017-02-09 16:02:04

594_Phil_Taylor
Members
Registered: 2013-01-04
Posts: 158

Re: Austin 10/4 performance

I totally agree with Stephen that the original fuel system was extremely reliable and robust - but we seem to have strayed from the original thread on how to improve 10 performance? Regards
Phil

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB